Where Do You Fall? The 10-80-10 Model

The 10/80/10 model (or rule) is a theory of leadership that addresses group dynamics, and, though the theory originated in the corporate world, it is highly relevant in education as well. In the model, all the people in an institution fall into three distinct areas, with the vast majority (80%) falling into a central neutral zone, with the remaining 20% splitting equally between those that will readily embrace a change and those that protest any deviation from the norm.

Anytime that leadership must guide and transition individuals through change, such as adoption of a new technology or a shift toward learner-centered environments, these groups quickly come to focus. To better explain this, let’s look at each segment individually.

 

The Tech Adoption Curve: Laggards

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various segments of the Technology Adoption Curve.

Before we dive into working with Laggards, let’s be clear that the title does not mean that an individual in this group is less intelligent, less dedicated, or a poor teacher. Rather it signifies that they have a fear of new technology and what it means for them. While the fear may exist at different levels and be caused by a variety of factors, it is a very real thing.

Because Laggards hesitation to adopt new technology and tools is rooted in emotion, Laggards often require one-on-one attention to succeed. They need to understand why the technology is necessary, how to use it, and when to use it before they’ll even consider making a change.

While this group can be frustrating to work with, you must always remember to guide them.

The Tech Adoption Curve: Late Majority

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various segments of the Technology Adoption Curve.

The Late Majority are most easily identified as “the skeptics”. Unlike their peers in the earlier segments, these individuals are not automatically intrigued or excited by new technology.

That doesn’t mean, however, that they are anti-technology. It’s simply means that they need more information.

The key to working successfully with the Late Majority is providing proof that the technology works, that it can be successfully used to support instruction, and that it has an impact on learning. Hearing success stories from Innovators, Early Adopters, and those in the Early Majority will peak their interest, and once you’ve provided sufficient evidence to convince them that the technology you are implementing will be worth their time, they will dive in with both feet.

The Tech Adoption Curve: Early Majority

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various segments of the Technology Adoption Curve.

The first large group you’ll find on the curve is the Early Majority. Those in this group can make or break your initiative—by either building momentum or determining the tool/opportunities in unimportant and not worth their time.

To actually cross the Chasm (where many technology implementations have gone to die), your technology implementation must be adopted by the Early Majority.  As a result, convincing the Early Majority to try the new technology is key to the success of your implementation.

The Tech Adoption Curve: The Chasm

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various areas of the Technology Adoption Curve.

While we’ve previously discussed different groups of users, specifically Early Adopters and Innovators, this post will instead focus on a part of the Technology Adoption Curve that can mark the end of your campus’ success with a technology project or tool: The Chasm.

This break in the curve is where “shelfware”—technology purchased with good intentions, but not effectively implemented and ends up in storage—first goes on to the shelf.

The Tech Adoption Curve: Innovators & Early Adopters

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is the first in a series focusing on various segments of the Technology Adoption Curve.

The first groups you’ll find on the curve are Innovators and Early Adopters, both of which work hand-in-hand to bring new technology into use. Innovators are the great thinkers in the realm of technology; they are creating the latest and greatest, cutting edge technology, while Early Adopters can see what the Innovators have created, and find the practical application of the new technology and begin using the Innovators' creations and applying their ideas.

In short, these are the people that get things done.

(And, the ones that your campus leaders, instructional designers, and tech-related committees should be tapping on the shoulder—ASAP.)

Share Your Bright Spots - What's Working for You?

If you're ever looking for a truly great book about change, look no further than Switch by Chip and Dan Heath.  When I started reading Switch, I was doing so as a professional learning opportunity related to business.  Atomic Learning's entire purpose is really about helping people navigate change as they seek to unleash the power of ever changing technology in their teaching, learning and life.  Therefore, we are an organization that is constantly looking to also embrace change as we adapt to the new challenges and opportunities that learners face.

I quickly learned that Switch is far from just a business book.  It is really about better understanding how we, as humans, respond to changes in all aspects of life - from trying to adopt healthier eating or exercise to negotiating with a teenager to working with colleagues.

Meet Julie Rayhorn: Director of eLearning Implementation at Atomic Learning

If you are an Atomic Learning customer, you have likely communicated with Julie Rayhorn. As an account manager, she has worked with Atomic Learning customers around the world. A few years ago, Julie transitioned to working solely with colleges and universities in the United States (though our Australian customers are still talking about the excellent standard of service she provided).