Student Success: Small Ideas can Lead to Big Improvements

Implementing a student success strategy across campus is beyond important.

The success of every college student is at the top of an institution’s goals. However, reviewing processes, implementing changes, and working to evolve faculty practices can take time. Change takes commitment and isn’t always easy.

That said, there may be small, inexpensive ideas that educators can try to put into action to help with student success, while bigger changes are being planned out.

We recently read an article from the Chronicle of Higher Education that explores how researchers are taking a more behavioral approach to improving student success, and looking at what students go through emotionally when applying and working through college… “Researching colleges, applying, filing the FAFSA, registering for classes — the whole process of getting to and through college can be seen as a series of complex decisions crying out for a nudge.”

The article discusses several ways researchers have made an impact using small and inexpensive ideas. For example, researchers Ben Castleman and Lindsay C. Page, “tested a simple, cheap solution: Send at-risk students a series of customized text-message reminders that they could reply to for extra help. The messages raised enrollment substantially…”.   

3 Essential Strategies for Student Success

Research shows that 1 out of 3 students drop out of college after their first year—making it more critical than ever that they are prepared with the skills they need to be successful, and prompting many institutions to take a hard look at their current student success strategy.

If you’re campus is among them, here are three essential strategies you can put into action today that can have a lasting impact:

Evaluate and Ramp up Your Existing Orientation Program
Orientation is all about getting off on the right foot, so make sure that incoming students have a sense of community, feel safe, and are equipped with the self-management skills they need to succeed in college and beyond.

One example would be integrating resources, such as Atomic Learning course on “Becoming a Better Test Taker”, “Preparing for a College Workload”, or “Being a Better Note Taker” into a First Year Experience (FYE) course or another freshman intro course.

Focus on Student Success: Study Techniques [Infographic]

The infographic below summarizes recent findings on study habits and techniques of college students—the results may surprise you.

Studying Tips
Infographic by Stop Procrastinating

Interested in improving your own study skills or those of your students? Atomic Learning offers an array of professional online learning resources focused on ensuring students' college and career success, including:

How Do I Become a Good Note-Taker?
Do you forget information you hear? Master the art of note-taking with this informative online course. Learn why it's important, what approach may fit your learning style best, and why and when you should revisit your notes.

How Do I Become a Better Test Taker?
Preparing for and taking tests can fill some people with anxiety. In this course, you will learn strategies that can help you overcome that stress and be more successful when taking tests.

How Do I Manage My Time?
With all of the classes, homework, work, and activities that happen in college, managing your time wisely can be difficult. In this invaluable course, you'll learn methods and tips for managing your time.

Where Do I Go for Academic Support?
College can be overwhelming! This course will help you find the resources, on campus and online, to achieve academic success, as well as help you determine which may be right for you and your situation.

Interested in learning more about these online resources and others to ensure students are equipped with the skills they need to succeed in college and beyond? Visit www.AtomicLearning.com/highed/college-career-readiness or contact us today.

Still undecided on your 2016 New Year’s resolution? Make a resolution to learn!

We’ve all heard that it takes 21 days to form a habit. This, however, is a myth, according to an article in Forbes Magazine. When it comes down to it, it takes sacrifice and commitment to reach success with forming habits, which cannot happen in a matter of days.

This theory can also apply to your New Year’s resolution. Have you thought about what your New Year’s resolution might be? It doesn’t need to be driven by numbers or statistics (i.e. Lose 15 pounds, or Save $2,000). Why not make it your resolution to learn something new every day?

Whether it takes 21 days or not, make it a habit to build up your personal and professional development on a daily basis. Lifelong learning is a critical skill that we should all try to not only foster in students, but also in our own lives.

And, since 2016 has officially arrived, we’ve gathered a few of our favorite resources together in the Atomic Learning 12 Days of Learning to get you started. Need more ideas? Simply log into your Atomic Learning account using your institution’s method of access and utilize the ‘Discover’ tab to see some of the latest and greatest learning resources now available.

Happy New Year from Atomic Learning!

Safety Tip: Identifying a Threat Beyond Stereotypes

Safety is becoming an increasingly critical topic at schools, colleges, and universities across the country. This tip on how to identify a threat beyond stereotypes could save your life, and is worth watching!

 

Empower individuals with the skills needed to take ownership of their own safety—now, in college, and beyond—with a specialized online student safety awareness and prevention program focused on ensuring learners know how to trust their instincts, increase their observation skills, and develop an action plan for when faced with potential threats.

Interested in preparing your faculty, staff, and students with Real World Safety skills? Learn more.

More lifesaving tips:
The Right Way to Defend Yourself with Keys

A Night Vision Tactic Learned from Pirates

Safety Tip: A Night Vision Tactic Learned from Pirates

Safety is becoming an increasingly critical topic at schools, colleges, and universities across the country. This tip on using your own natural night vision could save your life, and is worth watching!

 

Empower individuals with the skills needed to take ownership of their own safety—now, in college, and beyond—with a specialized online student safety awareness and prevention program focused on ensuring learners know how to trust their instincts, increase their observation skills, and develop an action plan for when faced with potential threats.

Safety Tip: The Right Way to Defend Yourself with Keys

Safety is becoming an increasingly critical topic at schools, colleges, and universities across the country. This tip on correctly defending yourself with your keys could save your life, and is worth watching!

 

Empower individuals with the skills needed to take ownership of their own safety—now, in college, and beyond—with a specialized online student safety awareness and prevention program focused on ensuring learners know how to trust their instincts, increase their observation skills, and develop an action plan for when faced with potential threats.

12 Days Until the end of the Year – Make them Count!

With the holidays fast approaching and the year coming to a close, it can be hard to find time for professional development. We’ve made it easy for you to get the most out of the last 12 days of 2015!

Take a look at these twelve, quick and helpful articles on critical topics facing education.  Whether you read one-a-day or take them in all at once is entirely up-to-you.

12 Ideas to Foster Your Own Lifelong Learning

Investing in your own learning is the perfect gift to give yourself this holiday season.  Here are 12 ideas to get you started:

  1. Follow subject-matter experts and thought leaders on twitter such as:
    @AngelaMaiers, @gcouros, @joshmkim, @mcleod,@patrickmlarkin,
    @willrich45, @justintarte, and/or @DrBruceJ
     
  2. Find a blog—and keep up with it.  Lots of the thought leaders on twitter, like George Couros, regularly write though-provoking posts that are well worth a read. Pick a few from the top Higher Ed blogs lists from EdTech Magazine. 
     
  3. Sign up for a newsletter that appeals to you.  We're avid readers of Education Dive's Higher Ed newsletter and Inside Higher Ed.
     
  4. Subscribe to an education magazine (several are free!) such as University Business, Tech & Learning, THE Journal, EdWeek or The Chronicle.
     
  5. Get professional development tips sent to your inbox.  Sign up at http://al.atomiclearning.com/tips.
     
  6. Check out a Twitter chat.  There's truly one for every education topic and every time of day. The Twitter education chat schedule is at https://sites.google.com/site/twittereducationchats/education-chat-official-list.
     
  7. Network with educators and thought leaders in person at a national or regional conference. If getting away isn't in the plan, some conferences offer a virtual attendee option, including EDUCAUSE and ISTE.
     
  8. Build skills for self-improvement through Atomic Learning.  Here are a few to start with:
  9. Start a Faculty Learning Community in your school. Check out what Miami University is doing with FLC's to get you started.
     
  10. Take a bold step and present at a conference.  You’ll learn an amazing amount from the process and the attendee interaction. 
     
  11. Become a better digital researcher through the Literacy: Reimagined series on Atomic Learning.
     
  12. Be inspired through a TED Talk!  One that we hope every educator checks out is the YOU MATTER talk from Angela Maiers.  We believe in it so much that we partnered with Angela to create a series on the topic.
     

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