Research Study: Less than 1 in 3 Teachers are Satisfied with PD

Teachers Know Best, a recent study contracted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, found that less than 1 in 3 teachers are highly satisfied with current professional development offerings. Here’s an excerpt:

All told, $18 billion is spent annually on professional development, and a typical teacher spends 68 hours each year—more than a week—on professional learning activities typically directed by districts… Yet by many measures, including the views of teachers themselves, much of this effort and investment is simply not working. In interviews, teachers say that too many current professional development offerings are not relevant, not effective, and most important of all, not connected to their core work of helping students learn.

The level of dissatisfaction shared in the study is an area for potential concern for districts.

A Message Can Be Life-Changing: A Parent’s Perspective

Guest Post by Kim Juelke, Marketing Strategist

Like many of us with school age children, I recently attended my child’s parent-teacher conference. From day one I have considered myself fortunate that my child is in a classroom where each student is acknowledged and valued for what they bring to the world.

Help Students Be Mindful of Security and Safety Concerns

In a time when our society is becoming more and more aware of the importance of violence prevention and safety, Atomic Learning has partnered with Mindset Matters to offer resources to help students develop the key skills they will need to be mindful of security and safety concerns that the world around us presents them.

Varying Approaches to Teacher Professional Development

An article published last year by the folks over at the Stanford d.school walked through the various types of teacher professional development currently available, including a brief overview of each. The author Melissa Pelochino, an experienced educator, goes on to share her thoughts on why these types of professional development aren't working for today's educators, here's an excerpt:
Most teachers participate in all of these types of professional development concurrently. The result is confused, overwhelmed teachers who find it difficult to know what to focus on first and who have a hard time remembering what they are working on and for whom. I have seen many teachers develop “cheat sheets” to help them keep track of all of the professional development they are participating in. Often, the PD calendar is set at the beginning of the year and is not responsive to the immediate and changing needs of the students and staff.
 
PD is still being delivered in a 20th-century lecture style, and most of it looks the same: teachers sitting in rows, staring at computers or cellphones while a person at the front of the room talks at them and refers to a computer screen from time to time...

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