Celebrating Read Across America with Reading Focused PD

March 2nd marks Read Across America Day! Sponsored by NEA, this annual event celebrates reading reading and literacy. Hoonuit by Atomic Learning is celebrating by launching another great learning module focused on reading skills:
 

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Reading in the Content Area - NEW!
Reading a novel and reading a chemistry textbook are two very different experiences, as I’m sure you know.

This new module by Dr. Therese Kiley discusses the different strategies employed when reading different materials—from novels to poetry to menus to textbooks—and how to support your students in their growing literacy skills.


Looking for more resources focused on reading skills?
Be sure to check out these additional professional development modules:

Making Sense of Educational Data

Guest blog post by Dr. Nicole M. Michalik – Cowriter (with Dr. Jeff Watson) of the series Making Sense of Educational Data

There are those things in life that are so common or necessary it is just expected that you know all about it, what to do with it, or better yet, how to do it.  I recently read an article about the 30 things everyone should be able to do by the age 30.  I am over 30 so I gave the article a go.  I can swim, find my way around without GPS, and could get from point A to point B driving a stick shift if I had to.  Skip to the end, I nailed 29 of those 30 items.  While the list was pretty fluffy and easy to check off if you are even remotely connected with modern life in the United States, I cannot do 1 of those items.  I cannot change the oil in my car. 

I know what oil looks like and I know what the finished product should be - mainly clean oil in the car, dirty oil not in the car - but the technical aspects of how to change the oil elude me.

I don’t have a list of the 30 things educators should be able to do, but I’m sure that at least one expectation today is that educators should know what to do with data.  Education data is so common and necessary, educators should just know what it is and what to do with it.  Teachers and administrators are to ‘analyze the data’ and ‘make data-driven decisions’ to ‘positively affect student outcomes’.  Now, get to it!

But maybe, just maybe, no one ever explained to you what to do with the data.  Those basic pieces of how to actually change the oil were conveniently glossed over on the road to becoming a teacher or in your teaching experience itself.  It’s possible that you attended a professional development session on data and using data to make decisions.  Remember that 30-minute session 5 years ago?   You were given the oil and you know where it should go in the end, but you don’t know what to do in between, except maybe that there is some draining and disposal. 

Classroom Management in 1:1 and BYOD Classrooms

Guest Blog Post by Mason, Learning Ambassador

As a new instructional coach at a 1:1 high school campus, I am always looking to learn and grow so that I can offer teachers the best advice to help improving teaching and learning with technology. Our campus deployed iPads 1:1 in October of 2016, and one of the biggest challenges we’ve faced are the unique classroom management needs in a 1:1 classroom.

Learning from your PLN

 

Guest Blog Post by Knikole Taylor, Learning Ambassador

It goes without saying that teachers have more and more placed on their plates.  From classroom instruction, inclusive of remediation, acceleration and accountability, to parental communication, there are a lot of things that come along with being a successful educator.  However, there is help!  You don’t have to navigate the world of education alone.  Your PLN, or professional learning network, is only a click away, ready to help you navigate the many issues that lie ahead.  A professional learning network is a group of people who share similar interests.  These people work together to share ideas and resources in education.  

How to Build Your PLN

The easiest way to build your PLN is to get involved.  Join conversations in order to share and learn from others around the globe.  Need help getting started?  Try one of the resources below.

PAUL HESSER NAMED CEO OF ATOMIC LEARNING AND VERSIFIT TECHNOLOGIES

Atomic Holdings, the parent company of Atomic Learning, Inc. and Versifit Technologies, announces the appointment of Paul Hesser as Chief Executive Officer.  

I am excited to join a dynamic company with a laser focus on helping educators increase student success,” said Hesser. “The recent launches of the Hoonuit Learning Framework and Early Warning Predictive Analytics are just two examples of our progressive initiatives to provide solutions that dramatically improve school and student outcomes.”

Hesser will lead the combined organization’s continued focus on solutions that increase student success and retention through the delivery of comprehensive accountability analytics and professional development to the education market.

We hear school leaders voicing the need to truly measure how professional development impacts teacher growth and student achievement,” said Hesser. “The blend of outcome-based professional development and an outcome-based analytic platform provides the tools education leaders need to maximize student success.

With over 25 years of technology leadership experience, Hesser brings an extensive background in helping customers take advantage of evolving technology and digital trends to maximize their performance.  He holds an MBA from the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management, and a BS in marketing from Illinois State University.

Join the Atomic Learning Ambassador Team

Interested in becoming a Learning Ambassador?  Join the Atomic Learning Ambassador team with other connected educators around the country.  The purpose of the team is to build a community of educators who collaborate and grow through the support of the members.  The Learning Ambassadors can participate in as little or as much as they'd like and each level attained opens more opportunity for the member.  

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