PAUL HESSER NAMED CEO OF ATOMIC LEARNING AND VERSIFIT TECHNOLOGIES

Atomic Holdings, the parent company of Atomic Learning, Inc. and Versifit Technologies, announces the appointment of Paul Hesser as Chief Executive Officer.  

“I am excited to join a dynamic company with a laser focus on helping educators increase student success,” said Hesser. “The recent launches of the Hoonuit Learning Framework and Early Warning Predictive Analytics are just two examples of our progressive initiatives to provide solutions that dramatically improve school and student outcomes.”

Hesser will lead the combined organization’s continued focus on solutions that increase student success and retention through the delivery of comprehensive accountability analytics and professional development to the education market.

“We hear school leaders voicing the need to truly measure how professional development impacts teacher growth and student achievement,” said Hesser. “The blend of outcome-based professional development and an outcome-based analytic platform provides the tools education leaders need to maximize student success.”

With over 25 years of technology leadership experience, Hesser brings an extensive background in helping customers take advantage of evolving technology and digital trends to maximize their performance.  He holds an MBA from the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management, and a BS in marketing from Illinois State University.

Join the Atomic Learning Ambassador Team

Interested in becoming a Learning Ambassador?  Join the Atomic Learning Ambassador team with other connected educators around the country.  The purpose of the team is to build a community of educators who collaborate and grow through the support of the members.  The Learning Ambassadors can participate in as little or as much as they'd like and each level attained opens more opportunity for the member.  

Start Your Year with Personalized Professional Development

 

Curious how Atomic Learning can work for your district? Read below as Shawna Ford describes how Weatherford ISD is maximizing their use of Atomic Learning. Shawna is a Future Ready Learning Coordinator, connected educator and one of our newest Learning Ambassadors.  You can connect with her on Twitter as she shares relevant educational technology resources. 

How is Atomic Learning working to help align with your district goals? 

In Weatherford ISD, we are focused on creating a personalized learning environment for ALL learners in our district, including our adult learners.  We recently spent some time on a new strategic plan which includes our belief statements. One of our belief statements is “Teachers are constant learners, problem-solvers and collaborators.” Atomic Learning provides the opportunity for our teachers to learn what they want when they want, encouraging constant learning.

The Best Holiday 'Card' That You'll Get This Year -- Really

In place of a traditional holiday card, we’ve written twelve insightful articles. This is our 3rd annual 12 Days of Learning, and each year we keep making it better and better. Feel free to share this resource out with your teachers and staff. These quick reads cover a variety of topics and are perfect for personal professional development!

To view the articles by clicking the image below or visit: http://www2.atomiclearning.com/12-days-of-learning.

12 Ways to Energize Learning [Infographic]

Student engagement is always on the minds of educators, and, while it can feel overwhelming with all the moving parts—student retention, test scores, and more—you must start somewhere!

To help, we’ve pulled together a list of twelve ways you can shake up and energize learning with tried and true instructional strategies.

Ready to dive deeper into one (or all!) of these topics? Atomic Learning is here to help with professional online courses on each:

11 Strategies to Support Students with Disabilities


This article is based on the upcoming Helping Students with Disabilities Succeed course being developed for Atomic Learning by Dr. Theresa Kiley, a former Associate Professor at Argosy University and Western Illinois University, published author, and education conference keynote speaker.  (More about Dr. Kiley.)

Working with students with disabilities can be rewarding, yet challenging. In many situations, a student’s disability is not easily observed. To add to the difficulty, there are a variety of disabilities that general education teachers can often encounter. Regardless, preparing to teach students with disabilities and diverse characteristics is essential for all educators.  Schools must provide academic opportunities for these students that are equivalent to those provided for their nondisabled peers.

To help, here are eleven strategies to help teachers support students with disabilities:

ADD/ADHD

As the number of individuals being diagnosed with ADD/ADHD continues to rise, the need for lessons that are accessible for all students is also increasing. We invite you to consider these suggestions developed by Universal Design:

  1. Provide important information in both oral and written formats.
     
  2. Provide printed materials early in the course to allow students time to read the texts and reference any available software.
     
  3. Avoid last-minute assignment or additional assignments after distributing the course syllabus.

Memory Loss

Memory problems associated with learning disabilities can interfere with storage of new information, as well as the ability to retrieve that information at a later time. In order to assist students with memory issues, here are a few suggested strategies:

  1. Allow students to access memory devices such as lists of background information (e.g., formulas or dates) to be used in problem solving or essay writing.
     
  2. Have students create realistic timelines when studying for tests. Test dates should be listed on a large wall calendar and dates and times reserved for studying should be clearly visible.

Executive Functioning

A few characteristics of students who struggle with executive functioning would be poor time management and planning skills. They may also struggle with paying attention and staying focused. Here are a few strategies to help overcome these barriers:

  1. Help students develop effective schedules that allow them to monitor task completion.  Avoiding procrastination is key.

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